Prayer is the Key

Blue Prayer Booklet

Blue Prayer Booklet

Lord, I turn the key of prayer in Faith.
I am set free to trust in your Providence.
Lord, I turn the key of prayer with Hope.
I am set free from fear;
knowing that you desire to do for me
what I cannot do for myself.
Lord, I turn the key of prayer for Love.
I pray that you may bless others (name) and
transform me to set me free.


February 07,2016

The Jubilee Year of Mercy

Pope Francis began the Year of Mercy on December 8, 2015. These reflections are preparation for our parish Lenten theme which will focus on “Compassion” as the way we both experience and share God’s mercy in our everyday lives.

The Jubilee of Mercy and the Promise of Christ: Section 3
Arthur J. Serratelli, S.T.D., S.S.L, D.D.
Bishop of Paterson

 

[19] In many ways, modern theology has stepped away from the Church’s long standing custom of granting indulgences. To most of our more recently catechized young Catholics, the concept of an indulgence is unknown. To many, even to some in ministry, the idea is outdated. And, certainly, to those of other faiths, the notion is misunderstood. What, then, is an indulgence? Why do we need one? What gives the Church the privilege to grant one?

[20] Sin affects us in two ways. First, mortal sin completely breaks our relationship with God. In choosing to sin in a serious way, we close ourselves completely to God and set ourselves on the path to the eternal separation from God which is hell. In his mercy, God offers us the Sacrament of Reconciliation to repair our broken relationship and place us in the state of sanctifying grace on the path to heaven. Venial sin does not destroy our communion with God, but it does weaken it. It lessens our charity and increases our attachments to this world.

[21] Second, whenever we sin, we not only offend God, but we harm ourselves. In sinning, our heart becomes disordered. We turn from God who is our true happiness in order to find some passing pleasure in his creatures. In confession, the priest’s absolution takes away our sins for which we are truly sorry. But, his absolution does not remove the harmful effects of sin within us. These effects, these unhealthy attachments to this world, weigh us down. They cause us sufferings, both physical and spiritual, that are called the temporal punishment due to sin.

[22] We should not deceive ourselves into imagining that temporal punishment due to sin comes from an angry and vengeful God. Not at all! God is love and always loving us. The punishment for sin comes from the very nature of sin itself. In sinning, we bend our human will against God. By prayer, fasting and works of mercy, we must struggle and suffer to bend our will back toward God. And, mercy is the best way. For “[We] may cultivate [our] heart, clear the soil…root out vices, sow virtues, but if [we] do not release the springs of mercy, there is no fruit” (St Peter Chrysologus, Sermo 43). Mercy makes our heart beat in unison with the heart of God.

To read complete bulletin click here


January 31, 2016

The Jubilee Year of Mercy

During the next few weeks this column will print, as an ongoing series in sections, our Bishop’s Pastoral Letter: “The Jubilee of Mercy and the Promise of Christ.”

Pope Francis began the Year of Mercy on December 8, 2015. These reflections are preparation for our parish Lenten theme which will focus on “Compassion” as the way we both experience and share God’s mercy in our everyday lives.

The Jubilee of Mercy and the Promise of Christ:
Section 2
Arthur J. Serratelli, s.t.d., s.s.l, d.d.
Bishop of Paterson

[10] In reporting Jesus’ first sermon in the synagogue of Nazareth, Luke gives us the only mention of the Jubilee in the entire New Testament. Jesus stands before his townsfolk and reads from the prophet Isaiah. With the last line of the text, Jesus announces that he has come “to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor” (Lk 4:19). The expression “the year of the Lord’s favor” (Is 61:2) clearly alludes to the Jubilee laws in Leviticus. Thus, Jesus’ declaration that he fulfills this text is the “Liberty Bell” sounding Forth the true freedom for God’s people.

[11] Throughout his gospel, Luke paints the portrait of Jesus as the one who ushers in the Jubilee. With his miracles of mercy, Jesus sets the downtrodden free and liberates the oppressed. He is the Divine Physician whose mercy makes him the friend of sinners, the helper of the needy and the consoler of the afflicted. His cross and resurrection accomplish “the total fulfillment of the messianic program that Christ once formulated in the synagogue at Nazareth” (Pope John Paul II, Dives in Misericordia, 8).

[12] At the very center of Luke’s gospel, in chapter 15, the evangelist clusters the parables of the Lost Sheep, the Lost Coin and the Prodigal Son. These three parables reveal the overwhelming mercy of God. In the ministry of Jesus, God is not merely inviting sinners to return nor is he simply accepting those who do. Rather, He is actively going out to seek and find the lost. The heart of God beats with unrelenting mercy for each of us sinners.

[13] In Mark’s gospel, only after Jesus announces the coming of the kingdom does he call for repentance. He says, “The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent…” (Mk 1:15). The order is important. First, God’s grace; then, our response. God has come among us to save us in Christ. This is pure mercy. His saving presence, then, leads us to repentance.

To read complete bulletin click here


January 17, 2016

Wedding at Cana – The Time is Now

The wedding at Cana was the first public miracle of Jesus and was initiated by his mother, Mary. Mary’s direct trust in Jesus and Jesus’ sensitivity to the needs of others was a miraculous combination.

The following is a reflection by Rosemary Haughton, (The Passionate God) of the dynamics between Jesus and Mary which may give us insight into our prayer and interaction with our Blessed Mother and with our Lord.

She Left It With Jesus

Woman, my hour has not yet come.
– John 2:1

Mary had, in her impulsive demand, given to her Son the clarification he needed in trying to understand his own direction. And he, in rejecting that kind of authority in her, gave her tremendous insight into who, and what, he truly was. We can see that in what followed. She did not renew her request, rather something happened to the character of the request itself. It became something which she had given him, and she left it with him; she took her hands off it, as it were. She simply bade the servants do whatever he told them.

It was an act of trust, of homage even, but with no hint of servility. And it set him free. It set him free in relation to this particular situation in which there was a real, human need for precisely that action which she had demanded. There was a need for it, and therefore it was appropriate that he should fulfil that need, and her action made him able to do so, because it broke a barrier for him …

To respond was to respond in love, to liberate into this particular bit of the world of sin (“sin” being, here, the lack of wine, and the social humiliation and personal hurt for the family that such lack involved) the power of exchanged life which it was his whole mission to pour out on earth. The time was “not yet” but love and need could bypass time. To meet this simple, real, human need the love of the risen Lord – Messiah, the saving God who feeds his people, who “fills the hungry with good things” – could go ahead of itself. Divine Wisdom could indeed say, as she had come to do, “Come and eat of my bread and drink of the wine which I have mixed.”

To read complete bulletin click here


January 10, 2016

The Baptism of the Lord

“You are my beloved child;
with you I am well pleased”

– Luke 3:22

In today’s Gospel God celebrates with delight in Jesus who begins his public mission. God delights in us as sons and daughters, a privilege that we receive through our Baptism.

St. Catherine of Siena (1347-1380) reflects on God’s love for us.

CREATED FOR LOVE

“If we know ourselves, we find God’s love. Why, because we see our own nothingness (seeing ourselves as beloved creations of God) that our very existence is ours by grace and not because we have a right to it, and every grace beyond our existence as well – it is all given to us with boundless love. Then we discover so much of God’s goodness poured out on us that words cannot describe it. And once we see ourselves so loved by God, we cannot help loving him. And within ourselves we love God and our own rationality, and hate the distractions that would take inordinate attention in the world.

Some people delight in wealth or status, or would rather please creatures than the Creator. These build their foundation in only worldly appearance, pleasure and enjoyment.

I want you to love God’s goodness within yourself, and his immeasurable charity, which you will find in the heart of self-knowledge. In this heart you will find God. For just as God holds within himself everything that shares in being, so you will find within yourself memory, which holds and is well-suited to hold the treasure of God’s blessing. There too you will find understanding, which makes us sharers in the wisdom of God’s Son by understanding and knowing his will, a will that wants nothing but that we be made holy. When we see this, we cannot despair, no matter what happens, for we know that everything is done with God’s providence and tremendous love.”
Excerpt from: The Letters of Catherine of Siena

To read complete bulletin click here


January 03, 2016

The Epiphany of the Lord

The New Year
“Mary reflected in her heart.”

– Luke 2:20

Tick, Tock, God is Near

One of the most significant inventions of all time is the mechanical clock. To be sure, there were sand clocks and water clocks and sun clocks and candle clocks for many millennia, but with the mechanical clock the human race incorporated the night hours into its schedules. And that was momentous. For, up to that time, night was a time to eat, to tell stories, and to sleep. Jesus, living in the pre-mechanical time, makes reference to that … he says, ‘Night time comes when no one can work.’ Now we say, ‘Work and shop until you drop’ at the stores, and factories open 24 hours a day.

The mechanical clock met a need, the need of monks to pray at set times. But the clock takes on a different function today. It does not summon us to prayer, but tempts us to fill every hour, every minuteand every second of our lives with a thousand bits of busy-ness that leave us no time for God, or for ourselves.

Advertisers add to the problem by compressing time for us. In July they advertise back-to-school sales; in September, Christmas gifts; at Ash Wednesday, Easter finery; in May, Summer sales. They move us constantly round and round like squirrels on a wheel, never giving us the time to savour the current celebration and mystery, in the hot economic pursuit of the next … As some wrote in a rather cynical poem:

To read complete bulletin click here


December 27, 2015

FEAST OF THE HOLY FAMILY

Fathering and Mothering God

“See what love God bestowed on us that we may be called the children of God.”
– John 3:1

Reflection

God our Father, your will be done, on earth as in heaven. We thank you for giving us the bread we need. Holy is your name.

You hold us in your strong arms like a mother with a newborn infant. You have raised your children from generation to generation, planting seeds, harvesting grain, baking fresh bread, preparing meals, feeding your people, holding us up when we are too weak to stand on our own, teaching us how to walk and enabling us to go forth in the world as your daughters and sons.

God our Mother, you are the womb of our power, our tenderness and our courage. We forget too often that you are God. Holy is your name.

We who are as varied as your names are numerous, as varied as the ways in which you reveal yourself to us, we delight to be your cooperative, imaginative workers in a world abundant with redemptive images.

God our Father, your will be done, on earth as in heaven. We thank you for giving us the bread we need. Holy is your name.

We see you in the sun and in the moon, the rain and the wind, coming power. We see you in the liberation of humanity from injustice and oppression. We see you coming with power. Holy is your name.

God our Mother, you are the womb of our power, our tenderness and our courage. We forget too often that you are God. Holy is your name.

We see you in our friends and lovers, our spouses and children. We know your passion, your commitment to right relations amongst us. We experience you, coming with power.

To read complete bulletin click here


December 20, 2015

Parish Advent Program

Wrap your Gifts in Prayer

Unwrap the gift of God in Prayer. In the midst of Advent and Christmas busyness, we offer you a way to pray and to discover our God who is with us. Each season the preparation for gift giving can be a source of stress. This year can be different. Our Christmas practice of gift giving is intended to be a visible symbol of love and Christian service in action. Why not use our gift giving as a form of prayer? Wrapping your gift in prayer can add a spiritual dimension to an ordinary task.

Wrap Your Gift in Prayer

As you choose your gift, ask for God’s guidance and bring a prayerful awareness to the exchange. When you actually wrap your gift, whether in wrapping paper or in a gift bag, pray for the recipient. Ask God to fillthem with light, love and the peace of Christmas. Cards and electronic greetings may also be wrapped in prayer.

Prayer Method Choices
  • Imaginevisualize the person for whom you pray. Picture the Lord blessing them.
  • Speak pray out loud, “Lord surround (name) with your light; fill him/her with your peace. ”
  • Sing – a Christmas carol.
  • Gesture dedicate the use of your hand motions in wrapping as your prayer.
  • Hear – simply repeat the person’s name knowing that the Lord hears our every word.
  • Recite – a pre-written prayer, Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be, Rosary…
  • Act – reach out to someone in need of the gift of your care.
  • Bless – difficult relationships with prayer: Lord bless (name) and transform me to set me free.

To read complete bulletin click here


December 13, 2015

Parish Advent Program

Wrap your Gifts in Prayer

Unwrap the gift of God in Prayer. In the midst of Advent and Christmas busyness, we offer you a way to pray and to discover our God who is with us. Each season the preparation for gift giving can be a source of stress. This year can be different. Our Christmas practice of gift giving is intended to be a visible symbol of love and Christian service in action. Why not use our gift giving as a form of prayer? Wrapping your gift in prayer can add a spiritual dimension to an ordinary task.

Wrap Your Gift in Prayer

As you choose your gift, ask for God’s guidance and bring a prayerful awareness to the exchange. When you actually wrap your gift, whether in wrapping paper or in a gift bag, pray for the recipient. Ask God to fill them with light, love and the peace of Christmas. Cards and electronic greetings may also be wrapped in prayer.

Prayer Method Choices
  • Imaginevisualize the person for whom you pray. Picture the Lord blessing them.
  • Speak pray out loud, “Lord surround (name) with your light; fill him/her with your peace.”
  • Sing – a Christmas carol.
  • Gesture dedicate the use of your hand motions in wrapping as your prayer.
  • Hear – simply repeat the person’s name knowing that the Lord hears our every word.
  • Recite – a pre-written prayer, Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be, Rosary …
  • Act – reach out to someone in need of the gift of your care.
  • Bless – difficult relationships with prayer: Lord bless (name) and transform me to set me free.

To read complete bulletin click here


December 06, 2015

Parish Advent Program

Wrap your Gifts in Prayer

Unwrap the gift of God in Prayer. In the midst of Advent and Christmas busyness, we offer you a way to pray and to discover our God who is with us. Each season the preparation for gift giving can be a source of stress. This year can be different. Our Christmas practice of gift giving is intended to be a visible symbol of love and Christian service in action. Why not use our gift giving as a form of prayer? Wrapping your gift in prayer can add a spiritual dimension to an ordinary task.

Wrap Your Gift in Prayer

As you choose your gift, ask for God’s guidance and bring a prayerful awareness to the exchange. When you actually wrap your gift, whether in wrapping paper or in a gift bag, pray for the recipient. Ask God to fill them with light, love and the peace of Christmas. Cards and electronic greetings may also be wrapped in prayer.

Prayer Method Choices
  • Imaginevisualize the person for whom you pray. Picture the Lord blessing them.
  • Speak pray out loud, “Lord surround (name) with your light; fill him/her with your peace.”
  • Sing – a Christmas carol.
  • Gesture dedicate the use of your hand motions in wrapping as your prayer.
  • Hear – simply repeat the person’s name knowing that the Lord hears our every word.
  • Recite – a pre-written prayer, Our Father, Hail Mary, Glory Be, Rosary …
  • Act – reach out to someone in need of the gift of your care.

For difficult relationships pray: Lord bless (name) and transform me to set me free.

Sharing your Prayer with a Gift Tag

After wrapping your gift in prayer attach a gift tag that will be provided for you.

To read complete bulletin click here


November 29, 2015

First Sunday of Advent 2015

THE STILL

Advent Reflection Story

When disaster strikes a British naval vessel a whistle is sounded called, “The Still.”
The crewmembers know what to do the instant the whistle blows – Be Still!
The Still is the moment to take stock and assess the present situation, thoughts and emotions. The Still is the time to ask the question, “What is the next best thing to do?”
Advent invites us into the stillness of God’s presence. Advent is the moment to take stock, assess our situation, thoughts, feelings, relationship with God, self and others. During this season of extreme busyness, Advent is an invitation into a prayer of inner stillness. In prayer, we discover the next best thing to do, joy in God’s presence and peace to share.
In St. Paul’s first letter to the Thessalonians he prays for the type of Advent and Christmas love for which we all hope, “May the Lord make you increase and abound in love for one another and for all, so as to strengthen your hearts, to be blameless in holiness before our God and Father at the coming of our Lord Jesus with all the holy ones. Amen”
Next week we begin our, Your Gift is Wrapped in Prayer Advent prayer activity. We prepare ourselves this week by spending some quiet time with our God for whom our soul in stillness waits.

Advent Meditation and Hymn

MY SOUL IN STILLNESS WAITS

– Marty Haugen

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits.
Truly, my hope is in you.

1. Oh Lord of Light, our only hope of glory.
Your radiance shines in all who look to you.
Come light the hearts of all in dark and shadow.

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits.
Truly, my hope is in you.

2. Oh Spring of Joy, rain down upon our spirits.
Our thirsty hearts are yearning for your Word.
Come, make us whole; be comfort to our hearts.

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits.
Truly, my hope is in you.

3. Oh Root of Life, implant your seed within us, and
In your advent draw us all to you;
Our hope’s reborn, in dying and in rising.

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits.
Truly, my hope is in you.

4. Oh Key of Knowledge, guide us in our pilgrimage.
We ever seek, yet unfulfilled remain.
Open to us the pathway of your peace.

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits
Truly, my hope is in you.

5. Come, let us bow before the God who made us.
Let every heart be opened to the Lord,
For we are all the people of His hand.

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits.
Truly, my hope is in you.

6. Here we shall meet the maker of the heavens,
Creator of the mountains and the seas.
Lord of the stars, and present to us now.

Refrain: For you oh Lord, my soul in stillness waits.
Truly, my hope is in you.

To read complete bulletin click here


November 22, 2015

WE REMEMBER, WE CELEBRATE, WE BELIEVE CHRIST OUR KING

“I came into the world, to testify to the truth. Everyone who belongs to the truth listens to my voice.” John 18

We remember the truth of Jesus humbling himself to share in our humanity so that we might share in His divinity.

We celebrate the truth that God continuously bestows grace, giving us life and challenging us to follow in Christ’s sacrificial example.

We believe the truth that all is gift and that we are created and commissioned as stewards of God’s bounty to serve one another with our time, talent and treasure.

Reflection Story

Sister Joyce Rupp O.S.M. shares the following story:
“A thought-provoking poem by Rabindranath Tagore tells of a beggar at the side of the road who was visited by a King who was on the journey. The King asks the beggar to give him a gift from his tattered back. The beggar is startled, for he has been thinking that the King will be giving him something rather than asking him for a gift. After all, the beggar has so little. The king has so much. The beggar reluctantly reaches into his bag and pulls out just one kernel of corn and gives it to the King. At the end of the day, when the beggar opens and empties his bag to see what he has gleaned from the day’s contributions, he discovers one tiny kernel of gold.

I try to remember this powerful message when I am reluctant to give of my presence and talents, when I hold back out of fear or selfishness. Love poured out in full measure will be returned in full measure, maybe not in the manner expected, but it will return in some form of abundance.” (Adapted)

Reflection Questions

Christ our King speaks to us and invites us to listen to the truth of God’s voice who invites us to share what we have been so lovingly given.

  • How is God inviting you to personal prayer, the celebration of the Eucharist, another form of devotion?
  • How is the Lord inviting you to appreciate your own gifts? What are they? What are your talents? How are you sharing them with others?
  • What are your giving habits, in the church collection, in the gift of your time and talent for the good of others, in your own self-care?

To read complete bulletin click here


November 15, 2015

We Remember, We Celebrate, We Believe

The Feast of All Saints begins the month of November and invites us to be mindful of Blessings.

We Remember our loved ones who share new life in Christ.
We celebrate the lives which continue to influence us.
We believe in the everlasting significance of all relationships which are signs and gifts of God’s Providence and eternal love.

How Many Loves Now
How many loves now
have moved across
my heart
leaving permanent marks?

How many loves now
are lost to me
by death
or fickleness
or distance?

How many loves now
glow inside of me
like a crackling fireplace
on a cold winters night?

How many loves now,
how many?

I gather them all,
the well-established
the long dead
the wish-I-could-come-in
the warming-my-heart ones,

Today all of them find their place
and seem to be content.
– Joyce Rupp

Reflection Questions

  • Recall the loved ones who now share new life in Christ. What qualities and gifts did they bring to your life? How are you following their good example?
  • For which relationships do you grieve? Jesus shares in today’s Gospel, “Heaven and earth will all pass away, but my words will never pass away.” How do these words of Christ bring comfort in sorrow and hope in despair?
  • Who are the people entrusted to your care that depend on you to bring light, love and hope? Who brings you light, love and hope?
  • How does prayer enable you to find a place of contentment for your ongoing thoughts, variety of feelings and needed discernment for action?
  • Pray – dona nobis pacem, Grant Us Peace about and for your relationships.

To read complete bulletin click here


November 8, 2015

Remember, Celebrate, Believe

The Feast of All Saints begins the month of November with remembering our loved ones who share new life in Christ. We celebrate their lives which continue to influence us, not only in the gift of love which they shared with us, but in our belief in their ongoing support and prayer as the Communion of Saints. Recognizing the value of their lives with a long view, we grow in our appreciation of the significance of our own lives. The Saints challenge us to recognize that God is trusting us to live with a spirit of purpose and action in our Mission of Opus Christi, Christ’s Work each day.

Diamonds are Forever

The young bride sits in the beauty salon chair and her hair stylist says to her, “New diamond earrings?” “Yes,” blushes the bride, “a gift from my husband.” “They are real,” observes the hairdresser. “How do you know?” asks the bride. “Easy,” remarks the wise beautician, “nobody buys fake diamonds that small.”

Small gifts are often the most valuable and the most precious of gifts.

Our readings speak about small gifts given with great sacrifice that are precious to God.

Scripture Reflection

  • In the book of the prophet Elijah a poor widow and her son share their last bit of food with the prophet. The Lord blesses their small offering with a never ending abundance.
  • The letter to the Hebrews proclaims that the sacrifice of Christ not only takes away sin but goes beyond expectations and brings salvation.
  • St. Mark’s Gospel relates the story of the widow who gives two small coins from her poverty. This active selfless giving earns the praise of Jesus.

Like diamonds formed long ago, these stories of sacrifice shine brightly even today. Our actions of giving and sacrificing however small are real, precious and are everlasting jewels in God’s eyes.

We remember: Our own lives on earth, our words and deeds, have an eternal significance.
We celebrate: Our purpose in life is to share the gifts and talents that God has given to us with open minds, willing hearts and hands eager to serve.
We believe: God enables us to bring forth from within us the wellspring of God’s love and the strength to sacrifice, in small ways, with and for love.

Reflection

A holy Christian life is made up of a number of small things:
Little words, not eloquent sermons;
Little deeds, not miracles of battle
Or one great, her heroic
deed of martyrdom;
The little constant sunbeam,
 not the lightning. Andrew Bonar

To read complete bulletin click here


November 1, 2015

November: In Communion with the Saints

Focusing

God calls each one by name.
Everyone’s name is sacred…
It demands respect as a sign of the
Dignity of the one who bears it.
(Catechism, 2158)

Scripture

Do not fear, for I have redeemed you. I have called you by name, you are mine. (Isaiah 43:1)

Can a mother forget her nursing child, or show no compassion for the child of her womb? Even these may forget, yet I will never forget you. See, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands. (Isaiah 49: 15-16)

I will give them an everlasting name that shall not be cut off. (Isaiah 56:5)

You shall be called by a new name that the mouth of the Lord will give. You shall be a crown of beauty in the hand of the Lord…You shall no more be termed ‘Forsaken…but you shall be called ‘My delight Is in Her.’ (Isaiah 62:2-4)

Rejoice that your names are written in heaven.
(Luke 10:20)

Quiet Time

Bring to mind the names of those you have
 known who have died…
so many names…
unlock your memory and acknowledge them
all as they pass before you…
Donal Harrington & Julie Kavanagh

Prayer

We thank you Lord for those dead who were so dear to us,
from whom such goodness flowed.
We pray that all they held sacred
and everything in which they were wonderful
will continue to mean much to us
and go on living in our hearts and lives.

We reach out and pray for all who mourn the death of a child or a parent, a brother or sister, a friend or relative.
We pray for all who have suffered an unspeakable loss,
and for those who go on blindly, unable to overcome their sorrow.
We pray for all who are discouraged
that they may not hate the light of life
but that they may keep an open heart.

We pray for all who die and are not mourned
but are ignored in death like a stone by the roadside.
We pray for all who are lost in war and prison,
for those who have committed suicide
and for those who are lonely in life or death,
that God may hear them, and keep them
in his heart.

In our prayer we give thanks to Jesus Chris our brother who died our death so that we might
live his life.

Huub Oosterhuis, Your Word is Near, 86-89

To read complete bulletin click here


October 25, 2015

A SACRAMENT OF HEALING
THE ANOINTING OF THE SICK

“Is anyone sick among you? Let them send for the priests of the church, and let them pray over them, anointing them with oil in the name of the Lord; and the Lord will raise them up; and if they have committed any sins, their sins will be forgiven them.” James 5:14- 15.

Next weekend at all of the Masses we will celebrate the Sacrament of The Anointing of the Sick. The Sacrament of the Sick is one of the healing sacraments. It is a balm for physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual ills.

The Ritual
  • The Sacrament may be administered individually or in a communal setting.
  • After an appropriate Scripture reading, the priest prays over the sick person by the laying on of hands on the head of the sick person. The priest anoints the sick person with the Oil of the Sick, which is blessed by the Bishop each year during the Chrism Mass. The Blessed Oils for our Diocese are kept in our church because we are now serving as the Cathedral Parish. The Silver Oil Urns in the Marion Shrine Area contain the three oils: The Sacred Chrism (Baptism, Confirmation and Holy Orders), Oil of Catechumens (Initiation, Baptism), The Oil of the Sick.
  • The forehead is anointed with the prayer:
    “Through this holy anointing may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit.” R. Amen.
  • The palms of the hands are anointed:
    “May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up.” R. Amen.
  • The following prayer can be said after the anointing:
    “Father in heaven, through this holy anointing grant your people comfort in suffering. When they are afraid give them courage, when afflicted give them patience, when dejected, afford them hope, and when alone, assure them of the support of your holy people. We ask this through Christ our Lord.”R. Amen.
  • Our Parish Plan for Prayer and Healing Next Weekend

    • Prayer for the healing power of God to be manifest in each one of our lives accompanied by appropriate music for healing will shape our worship theme.
    • Those who choose to receive the Sacrament of the Sick are asked to sit in the first or last row of any section of pews. Wheelchairs can be accommodated in the open space in front of the Ambo. This seating arrangement will allow us to have access to your head and hands for the anointing.
    • The Sacrament will be administered directly following a brief homily at all of the Masses.
    Prayerful Preparation
    • Please keep the sick among your family, friends and fellow parishioners in your prayer this week.
    • The month of November is a time when we celebrate our loved ones who are now with God, so it is fitting to ask the Communion of Saints to intercede for us and for those that we are keeping in prayer.
    • Pray for those who have no one to pray for them.
    • Prayerfully remember Health Care workers and all those who tend to the sick.
    • This is also an appropriate time to pray for wisdom for those who are discerning the best way to ensure Health Care for all.

    To read complete bulletin click here


    October 18, 2015

    SERVING CHRIST AMONG US

    “Whoever wishes to be great among you will be the servant of all.”

    Jesus came not to be served but to serve. Our mission is to share. Our time, talent and all that we are, have or ever will have are God’s gift. God gives to us, we give to each other. In sharing with others, we thank God and live our Mission of Opus-Christi, Christ’s work.

    This weekend, we listen to our Bishop share a homily and appeal to us for donations to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal.

    Each moment of our lives is a gift. In every moment we are asked to do what God does – to share freely of our bounty with others.

    What will we give of ourselves in the moment?
    As the Irish author Maria Edgeworth writes,

    “If we take care of the moments the years
    will take care of themselves.”

    Please prayerfully consider what gift you will share in this moment.

    BISHOP’S ANNUAL APPEAL

    If you have already made a pledge, thank you. If not, consider making a commitment this weekend during our in-pew process.

    The Difference Between Partners in Faith and Bishop’s Annual Appeal

    Money raised in Partners in Faith supported needs outside the annual Diocesan operating budget including the establishment of specific endowments to help with future needs.

    On the other hand, the Bishop’s Appeal is an annual drive designed to help meet the annual operating expenses of four specific ministries of the Diocese. Funds given to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal stay in the Paterson Diocese. They are not given to any other diocese, Archdiocese or any causes outside our own diocese.

    Your generosity to the Bishop’s Annual Appeal supports:

    • Catholic Charities
    • Seminarian Education
    • Inner-city Catholic schools
    • Nazareth Village, our retirement residence for our diocesan priests.

    To read complete bulletin click here