God Is Love

christ-be-our-light

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Banner Symbols

At the center of love’s heart is the cross, the symbol of God’s unconditional acceptance of us. The joined hands remind us that we love God by being love in action for one another. The hands reflect our Dalle de Verre stained-glass windows which represent the diversity of God’s gifts in us and in our Church as a community.


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK I

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Banner Symbols
At the center of love’s heart is the cross, the symbol of God’s unconditional acceptance of us. The joined hands remind us that we love God by being love in action for one another. The hands reflect our Dalle de Verre stained-glass windows which represent the diversity of God’s gifts in us and in our Church as a community.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK II

God is Love
Beloved, let us love one another, because love has its source in God…No one has seen God, yet as we love each other God dwells in us and God’s love is perfected in us… We love because God first loved us…God is love.

“To love another person is to see the face of God.”

Victor Hugo was a French poet, novelist and dramatist 1802 – 1885. He is the author of the famous work Les Miserables immortalized on stage and on film from which the quote above is taken. All of love is relationship and connection to God, self and others. We are made in the image and likeness of God so to love another person is to see the face of God. Our love manifests God’s providence and reflects God’s Divine nature at work within us. Our mission to do Opus Christi, Christ’s Work is to turn our face to God. We turn our faces in prayer so that we may be empowered and perfected to reflect God’s image through our own faces, words and works of love in action. During our theme “God Is Love” we will explore ways to more fully experience God’s unconditional love for us, through prayer and practices, by turning our minds and hearts to be love in action.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK III

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Our Theme Prayer:
Lord, turn my face with grace to love.
Turning our face with grace to love is a prayer practice based on St. Ignatius of Loyola’s prayer The Examen. This type of prayer takes an honest look at our thoughts, feelings and motivations. It invites God to move our mind, hearts and will toward loving self, others and God.

Banner Symbols
The first acronym (vertical left column) in our theme F.A.C.E – Fear, Attachment, Control, Entitlement is based on the ideas of David Richo and Mark Thibodeaux S.J.
The center prayer, Lord, turn my face with grace to love and the second acronym (vertical right column) is an original idea of our theme F.A.C.E. – Faith, Acceptance, Cooperation, Empathy.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK IV

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Our Theme Prayer:
Lord, turn my face with grace to love.
Turning our face with grace to love is a prayer practice based on St. Ignatius of Loyola’s prayer The Examen. This type of prayer takes an honest look at our thoughts, feelings and motivations. It invites God to move our mind, hearts and will toward loving self, others and God.

Banner Symbols
In prayer we turn from Fear to Faith – Attachment to Acceptance – Control to Cooperation – Entitlement to Empathy.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK V

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Our Theme Prayer:
Lord, turn my face with grace to love.
Turning our face with grace to love is a prayer practice based on St. Ignatius of Loyola’s prayer The Examen. This type of prayer takes an honest look at our thoughts, feelings and motivations. It invites God to move our mind, hearts and will toward loving self, others and God.

Banner Symbols
In prayer we turn from Fear to Faith – Attachment to Acceptance – Control to Cooperation – Entitlement to Empathy.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK VI

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Once upon a time in a tiny village in Poland, famine visited the land. Hungry villagers trying to control the situation hoard what little food they have behind locked doors and closed shutters. One day old Mateusz – a stranger to the townspeople – visits carrying a large pot and a large stone. Sitting next to the village well, he fills the pot with water and the stone announcing, “I will now make stone soup.” He invites curious children to gather some sticks and starts a fire under the pot. As the water boils, he tastes his soup saying, “MMM… So good. A little salt would help. Whomever brings some salt can share in my delicious soup.” From within a hut scurries a villager adding some salt to the pot. “Perhaps an onion will help?” A peasant comes forth with an onion and so it goes – a carrot – a potato – an old chicken – all into the pot. And that day the whole village ate their fill of the fine soup. They feasted abundantly because their faces turned from control to cooperation.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK VII

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Reflection Week VII
Entitlement to Empathy
When is the last time that you honked your horn in frustration with the car driver who was in your opinion too slow? Remember your bitter eye roll in the supermarket at the person ahead of you slowly, slowly bagging, who then takes out a checkbook ledger tediously filling out the date, occasion etc.? How about your feelings after holding the door for someone and getting no ‘thank you’? Those not working, try recalling… finding the last ice cube in a sea of empty trays, the always full/clean dishwasher light, the empty car fuel gauge. And last, ever cure ten lepers and have only one return to say ‘thanks’?

The word for an expectation that we have the right to something is called an entitlement. Entitlement manifests in these resentments, “get out of my way, hurry up, I should not have to wait, why is it always my turn, they didn’t even say thank you.” These thoughts change nothing of the reality they criticize but turn us toward anger and disharmony in relationships.

To read complete bulletin click here


GOD IS LOVE: WEEK VIII

During the next weeks we are exploring our theme “God Is Love”. Bulletin articles, homilies, music, reflection questions and prayer practices will enable us to grow spiritually and to live our mission to do Christ’s Work as love in action. Follow our journey at www.stphilip.org.

Reflection Week VIII
One day a lady decides to go to a movie matinee. The theater is crowded. She sits in the only seat left. As the movie begins, two people behind her are distracting her with their constant talking. The lady becomes annoyed. Her anger increases as one of them begins kicking her seat in an endless beat. Although upset, she is fearful of confrontation and attached to her idea of how people should behave in a movie theater. She wishes to control their behavior because she is entitled to a quiet, non-jolting experience. Suddenly, she feels a hot, rough wet something on her neck. Enough! She turns quickly around and finds herself face to face with a German Shepherd. Next, she notices the blind man holding the collar of the seeing-eye dog. Of course, the talking was one man explaining the movie to the blind man. The kicking of her seat was the dog’s tail and we presume that the dog licked her neck.

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SACRAMENT OF HEALING
THE ANOINTING OF THE SICK
NOVEMBER 2 & 3, 2019
“Is anyone sick among you? Let them send for the priests of the church, and let them pray over them, anointing them with oil in the name of the Lord; and the Lord will raise them up; and if they have committed any sins, their sins will be forgiven them.”

On the weekend of November 2 & 3 we will celebrate the Sacrament of The Anointing of the Sick at all Masses. The Sacrament of the Sick is one of the healing sacraments. It is a balm for physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual ills.

The Ritual
• The Sacrament may be administered individually or in a communal setting.
• After an appropriate Scripture reading, the priest prays over the sick person by the laying on of hands on the head of the sick person.
• The forehead is anointed with the Oil of the Sick. The prayer:
“Through this holy anointing may the Lord in his love and mercy help you with the grace of the Holy Spirit.” R. Amen.
• The palms of the hands are anointed:
“May the Lord who frees you from sin save you and raise you up.” R. Amen.
• The following prayer is said after the anointing at all Masses:
“Father in heaven, through this holy anointing grant your people comfort in suffering. When they are afraid give them courage, when afflicted give them patience, when dejected, afford them hope, and when alone, assure them of the support of your holy people. We ask this through Christ our Lord.” R. Amen.

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THIRTY-FIRST SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME NOVEMBER 3, 2019

SACRAMENT OF HEALING
THE ANOINTING OF THE SICK
NOVEMBER 2 & 3, 2019
“Is anyone sick among you? Let them send for the priests of the church, and let them pray over them, anointing them with oil in the name of the Lord; and the Lord will raise them up; and if they have committed any sins, their sins will be forgiven them.”

On the weekend of November 2 & 3 we will celebrate the Sacrament of The Anointing of the Sick at all Masses. The Sacrament of the Sick is one of the healing sacraments. It is a balm for physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual ills.

WE REMEMBER, WE CELEBRATED, WE BELIEVE
We remember all who have been called home by name. We celebrate God’s gift of eternal life on this festive weekend commemorating the communion of Saints. We believe that God whispers our names tenderly in prayer. One day we will hear the voice of the Good Shepherd say to us face to face, “Come you who are blessed by my Father, inherit the Kingdom prepared for you from the creation of time.”

To read complete bulletin click here